Los Feliz Neighborhood Council

Since 2002, we are city government at the local Los Feliz level, here to give back, serve, and assist our neighbors with city services. About your council

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Fruit-Pick Program Aims to “Free The Food”

Got falling fruit?

Are your low hanging oranges, lemons, limes or even kumquats and kiwis hitting the ground?  Has your yard become a vital source for vitamin C for…  coyotes, raccoons, squirrels, and skunks?

The Los Angeles Department of Public Works estimates more than 40 percent of the city’s edible food goes to waste each year.  40 percent.

Mayor Garcetti has issued a Food Waste Challenge to Los Feliz (and those other L.A. neighborhoods) to help get fresh fruit out of our landfills and into the hands of food-insecure children, the homeless, various hunger-relief organizations — even local schools!

Participating in the program sees that your surplus fruit goes to people who truly need it, and you don’t have to fill a bushel or even lift a finger to make it happen.

HOW IT WORKS:  Organized, trained pickers bring the equipment, and you point out which trees you want plucked.  Then the fully insured volunteers– they are climbing trees after all– go to work.  Zip.  Done.

If you have surplus fruit and might like to participate in this program, please complete this short interest survey.

Debra Matlock, our Environmental Affairs C​ommittee chairperson, says the fruit-pick program is “win-win,” because the community can even decide where fruit harvested in Los Feliz ultimately gets sent.

Local organizations from across the city who can demonstrate strong community support (“you”) and a fruit filled action plan (“us”) will receive grants to fully implement a neighborhood program preventing food waste, and we think Los Feliz should be one of them.

Sure, rodents need love too, but right now, people need your fresh fruit more. Take the survey and maybe add “humanitarian farmer” to your list of accomplishments.

Help #FreeTheFood.

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— Sarah Lynn Tressler

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Film & Focus: Mixing Moving Pictures and Informative Ideas

They come for the free popcorn and soda, but they stay for the meaningful exchanges.

That’s the Film & Focus series, launched by our Cultural Affairs Committee this past summer. The events bring the community together for an informative presentation by an expert on a chosen topic, followed by a film screening that thematically explores it.

Committee Chairman Nello DiGiandomenico says the turnout has demonstrated the community’s robust interest.

“Every time we’ve had one of these events, people have been really excited about it, and have a lot of questions about the topic afterward.”

The first installment featured author and UCLA professor Vincent Brook, who provided historical insight on Helen Hunt Jackson’s popular 1884 LA-centric novel, Ramona, followed by a screening of D.W. Griffith’s 1910 silver screen film adaptation.

The second series event examined public banking, with a talk from Public Bank LA’s Legislative Director, David Jette, followed by a screening of the 1983 film Trading Places, starring Eddie Murphy, Dan Aykroyd and Jamie Lee Curtis.

The next planned topic: Space Exploration. The Cultural Affairs Committee is at work securing a speaker (mostly likely from NASA) and selecting a film. Perhaps Elon Musk (who was recently spotted lunching at Home State) can make an appearance?

Whether Mr. Musk joins us or not, the Film & Focus events are a great way to connect with other Los Felizians.

“It provokes discussion,” DiGiandomenico says. “We’re so isolated in this digital age, so having an event where people come together and communicate is underlying it all.”

The committee is also soliciting suggestions for future topics.

If you’re keen on a speaker and a film that explores something you’re passionate about, please email hidden; JavaScript is required and let them know what topic and which movie you think would work well together!

— Sarah Lynn Tressler

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Free CPR Training Draws Crowds Each Month

Say you’re having dinner at a charming little restaurant on Hillhurst when someone at the next table grabs their throat while turning blue. Would you know what to do? Or what if you’re hiking in Griffith Park and another hiker keels over, clutching their chest. Could you know what to do?

Attendees practice administering chest compressions on CPR mannequins at classes held at the Los Feliz Branch Public Library.

Or what if you’re strolling up Vermont and see a pedestrian get struck by a car. Should you administer life-saving first aid until an ambulance arrives? Los Feliz residents who have attended our CPR/AED and First Aid classes know what to do. They practice administering CPR on training mannequins, learn the proper technique for helping a choking victim, and find out how to respond in other life-threatening emergencies, from basic first aid to advanced disaster preparation.

Did you miss the last class? Fear not! Classes are being held every month by our Public Health and Safety Committee.

Course topics include:

  • recognizing emergency situations
  • scene safety
  • what to do when contacting emergency responders
  • obtaining consent to administer first aid
  • when and how to deploy an automatic external defibrillator (AED)
  • earthquake preparation
  • how to apply several types of bandages

Attendees learn how to safely turn over unconscious persons during a recent class at the Los Feliz Branch Public Library.

… and more. This class is FREE and open to the public. Attendees receive a course completion certificate. If you require an official certification issued through the American Red Cross, the cost is $35, payable to the instructor via PayPal, Venmo or cash. Red Cross certificates are sent via email within 48 hours. Wallet cards are an extra $5. Please check our Calendar Page to find out when our next classes are scheduled. Space is limited, so sign up fast.

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